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e_moon60

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Dry: the numbers [Dec. 8th, 2008|09:13 am]
e_moon60
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An Austin station reported this morning that Austin's sixteen inches down in rainfall for the year. 

We've had less rainfall than Austin.

City wells are lower  than ever and one has flat quit--800 feet down, there's no more water in that hole.   Other wells aren't producing at the normal rate...too many wells have tapped into that aquifer in rapid development in this county.  (But the county is known to be development-friendly, so permits for new wells for developments are always given.)

The wind continues to blow.  Clouds blow over but no rain falls.   There's always been a rainfall gradient from the Gulf (high) to the west (lower and lower...) but this year it's extreme.   Sixteen inches down means less than half the average annual rainfall. 

Drought is a periodic event here, but with overall rising temperatures and changes in rainfall patterns, it appears it's going to be worse. 



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Comments:
[User Picture]From: puppetmaker40
2008-12-08 03:32 pm (UTC)
Atlanta has been in pretty bad shape for a couple of years now.

My father came up with a system to recycle rinse water for watering their formal gardens.

Here on Long Island we are doing fine for rain for the most part but without the steady cold weather and the snow, certain forms of insects (most of them bad for trees and shrubs) are thriving which means we are losing trees that we need to keep the house cool naturally.

Sorry to hear it is bad out in your neck of the woods as well.

Kathleen O'Shea David

Edited at 2008-12-08 03:33 pm (UTC)
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[User Picture]From: jhetley
2008-12-08 03:43 pm (UTC)
At least part of your rainfall ended up in Maine, instead. We have something like 8" more than normal.

Maybe you need to contact the delivery service.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2008-12-08 04:12 pm (UTC)
Have done. The delivery service said all they can do is follow the routing numbers on the package.

Friends of mine in Illinois, Indiana, and so on have complained about too much rain the past few years--I look at the jet stream and see that the colder air's being kept up there...not allowed to come down and make the Gulf moisture let go, except when a hurricane pushes it ashore--but neither of those got anywhere near us. Within fifty miles--we could see the clouds clearly enough--but not here.



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From: sizztheseed
2008-12-08 05:45 pm (UTC)
There must be a trend north, then. We had the wettest, most fertile summer in all the years I've been here (Southern Ontario). I'm used to a drought garden where only the toughest make it to mid-summer when the rain barrels give out. This summer, we barely needed to water five times, and the barrels were full until first freeze. Should have planted more peas, I guess.
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[User Picture]From: entp2007
2008-12-08 03:56 pm (UTC)
Once they suck the aquifers dry, that's it. They can't be recharged. The ground compacts and won't absorb the water anymore. Subsidence is a huge problem in some areas. It can create sinkholes that destroy roads, houses, and other structures. A lot, of course, depends on the structure of the rock.

Here's a dramatic example of subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley in Mendota, CA.

If anyone wants to see how nasty politics can get at all levels, just look at the history of water rights in the US, especially the west. I hope the good people of your area will do the right thing and curtail the over development.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2008-12-08 04:02 pm (UTC)
I've spent all my life (except for three years in the military) in dry, drought-prone areas. And I know there's not a hope in Hades that our county government will do the right thing. To them, Growth is Good. They're not biologists, geologists, hydrologists...and they think scientists are pointy-headed liberals. (Guess which party they belong to...)
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[User Picture]From: entp2007
2008-12-08 04:15 pm (UTC)
Hmmm... can't imagine what party they belong too. Sounds like they need a dramatic lesson in exponential growth before everyone learns the lesson. The hard way.

Speaking of the political parties. Jay Lake poses an interesting question on his lj account: What has conservatism gotten right?
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From: grandfellow
2008-12-08 04:34 pm (UTC)
I still think that it's those dadburn Communists have blown the earth off kilter with their secret nuclear tests so that the world is spinning differently and causing the weather to be strange. Proof of that is the fact that you don't see nearly as many dead armadillos on the side of the road as you did before. I hope our new President can do something about that (the communists, not the armadillos.)
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[User Picture]From: entp2007
2008-12-08 05:57 pm (UTC)
I will keep an eye out for giant radioactive communist armadillos.
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[User Picture]From: harfafnor
2008-12-08 06:18 pm (UTC)
I went hunting this past Saturday and was around Lake Altoona, just above Atlanta. It was down so far you could walk across the upper portions stepping over a small creek feeding into it. I'd say, about 5 feet down. Standing in the bottom near the creek I could look at eye level or just below to see the line on the bank where the water line used to be. Lake Lanier is our water supply and it too is way down. There have been big battles over who gets water from it. The Corps of Engineers have been figting to stop the flow some but it would diminish what is going to parts of Alabama and Florida.
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[User Picture]From: jhetley
2008-12-08 06:53 pm (UTC)
Lanier has been way down for years -- I used to fly into Atlanta regularly, back 1998-2002, and had a clear aerial view of the lake. Bathtub ring of red mud a hundred yards wide.
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[User Picture]From: farmgirl1146
2008-12-08 08:34 pm (UTC)
Scary, scary news.
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[User Picture]From: farmgirl1146
2008-12-08 08:34 pm (UTC)
Re water: Make sure to press your water rights. The counties are trying to take them away so that they can keep giving well permits all through the West.

Re weather: I was at a farming convention recently, and one speaker (who should have reason to guess/know) commented that the Puget Sound area (where I live) would have a climate change that would make our climate more like Northern California. What does this say about how weather in your area will change? Where does your weather come from? The Northeast?
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[User Picture]From: kk1raven
2008-12-11 11:41 pm (UTC)
Too bad I can't share some of our rain with you. The last time I checked we were supposedly several inches below normal rainfall for the year but I feel like we've had more rain than usual. It is falling right into my office tonight. At least it is falling onto metal cabinets there rather than the bookshelves in my bedroom. Leaks and books don't go together well. Hopefully the landlord (otherwise known as my mother) will actually get the problem fixed before it turns into a disaster.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2008-12-12 12:39 am (UTC)
Leaks are the pits. We had multiple leaks that we kept chasing around the roof (and house) until in a year with almost double the normal rainfall we had the attic (a low attic--low-pitched roof) full of every pan we could find and the water was still leaking into two bedrooms, the kitchen, the dining room...it was awful. We put on a new roof. Now all I have to do is repair the ceilings sometime...

I hope you get the roof fixed.
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