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e_moon60

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Two Thirds of the New Cookware [Apr. 13th, 2010|03:27 pm]
e_moon60
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So here's a picture of the old (circa early 1970s) LeCreuset oval pot, with the lid whose handle I didn't like, the new (as of Saturday) LeCreuset round pot, with the lid whose handle is much better, and the new All-Clad frying pan.   The new 8 quart stock pot's picture didn't come out well, due to clutter around and on the stove.  Another time.
   


I bought the blue one shortly after our marriage, and before all chickens were injected with extra liquid, it would hold a small fryer for lemon-rosemary chicken.  As chickens became "juiced up", there wasn't enough room for all the liquid that poured out of them, and I was boiling chickens, not roasting them.  Not so good.   It would hold a few quail, if I wanted quail, or a couple of chicken breasts.   I'm looking at new uses for it on top of the stove, or in the oven without the lid...that cute little arched handle is impossible to use with a mitt or potholder, so you have to have a stout fork that will slide under it.  And it's hard to clean under the handle.   This style is now considered "heritage" and sold in a more useful 4 quart size.   At the time, I couldn't afford anything larger and was cooking in a tiny apartment kitchen anyway.

The new red pot, OTOH, holds more and has a very useful lid-handle.  For reference, the red pot has a 3.5 quart capacity, and the blue one is just under 2 quarts if you fill it really full.   1.5 is more like it.  Another interesting difference is that the blue pot is not enameled on the bottom outside--the surface in contact with burners, though I always used it in the oven.  The red pot is completely enameled.  I guess that's why they say "Don't slide it across burners."

That 10" frying pan is a dream for frying eggs.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: kristine_smith
2010-04-13 08:39 pm (UTC)
::pot love::

The blue pot is very pretty.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2010-04-13 10:11 pm (UTC)
Pretty, but not as practical for how I cook (and the appetites I cook for) as the new pots. Though I'm thinking now of putting the leftover stew from last night into the blue pot, with some extra gravy, and then putting a topping on it. I wonder if I have any puff pastry packages lying around in the freezer...
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2010-04-17 11:36 pm (UTC)
Aaand...the puff pastry mostly sank. Should've just put biscuits on top. That's what my mother did to make a pretty dish and also stretch the stew (not in this pot, though, in an old pot she had that I have no idea where it went.)
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[User Picture]From: controuble
2010-04-13 08:47 pm (UTC)
I love my All-Clad pots and pans. Is the stock pot All-Clad, too? I've been thinking about getting one because homemade soup is so much better, but the stock pots are much more expensive than the smaller pans, so I would like someone else's opinion before I shell out that kind of money.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2010-04-13 10:38 pm (UTC)
The stock pot is All-Clad. And yes, I'm very happy with it. I usually make an insanely large amount of stock at a time, in a 20 quart pot (not All-Clad, but has an aluminum-sandwiched-in-steel bottom, made in China.) If you use that size pot, avoid Williams-Sonoma and try All-Clad's commercial line--the last time I looked, their big pot was not much more than the 8 quart home-size one. They make (but W-S didn't have) a 4 quart wide-based soup pot, too.

For just soup making, I'd been using Revere Ware Dutch-ovens/stock pots, and though the copper did help even out the heat some, the difference yesterday was noticeable, using the All-Clad. Especially the control of the level of simmer on low heat. Much more even across the bottom of the pot.
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[User Picture]From: melissajm
2010-04-14 12:02 am (UTC)
Lemon-rosemary chicken. Oh, that sounds good.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2010-04-13 10:39 pm (UTC)
I'm thinking I really need (cough-cough) a little larger red one as well as the small red one, for when we have company.

I'm so doomed.
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[User Picture]From: marthawells
2010-04-13 09:01 pm (UTC)
I've got two LeCreuset pots, one round like your new one, and one a braising pan. They are fabulous.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2010-04-13 10:39 pm (UTC)
I love all these "you chose right" comments!
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[User Picture]From: cailleuch
2010-04-13 10:18 pm (UTC)
I have small, medium and large versions of your red Le Creuset. Mine are orange and have been with me many years. Could not cook without them.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2010-04-13 10:40 pm (UTC)
I'm really looking forward to more cooking in the new pots. Not sure I'll ever get the really large, because of the weight.
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[User Picture]From: cailleuch
2010-04-13 11:41 pm (UTC)
My big Le Creuset is not their largest. That, when full, would be too heavy to pick up.

My big AllClad stock pot went with me to the store when I bought a new dishwasher. It had to fit.
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[User Picture]From: made_of_paradox
2010-04-17 11:02 pm (UTC)
Yes. I have taken my favorite big pot dishwasher shopping! (If that one fits, pretty much anything else will.)
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[User Picture]From: retrobabble
2010-04-13 11:18 pm (UTC)
Le Creuset are great pots, although sometimes I wish they were a bit lighter. They are so nice and easy to clean!

We have a Le Creust store in our town. I try to steer clear for pocketbook safety reasons.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2010-04-14 02:27 am (UTC)
I'm glad I live an inconvenient distance from the W-S store where I bought these. Although (whimper) just ONE more???? And the better kitchen shears did the rosemary snippage very well.
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[User Picture]From: made_of_paradox
2010-04-17 11:05 pm (UTC)
I could resist the cookware, but now you have me intrigued with the shears.

And I'm very regularly at a complex with a W-S store. :P
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2010-04-17 11:32 pm (UTC)
They were about $20, very heavy and have so far done admirably snipping rosemary off the bush and peas off the pea plants (though my thumbnail would almost take the peas off, at this stage. Snow peas, small, crisp, delicious.

They will eventually get their test when I try to split a chicken with them.
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[User Picture]From: made_of_paradox
2010-04-18 01:06 am (UTC)
When that happens, I'd be interested in hearing about it.

Edited at 2010-04-18 01:10 am (UTC)
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[User Picture]From: catlinye_maker
2010-04-14 12:49 pm (UTC)
We loved and used Le Creuset for years; it cleans up wonderfully. Unfortunately, DH's habit of burning food to the bottoms of pans meant that eventually the enamel started to flake off the interior, at which point they were retired in favor of metal pans.

I am sad, I loved the Le Creuset, but he's the cook in the family. Check out cutleryandmore.com, free shipping on some orders, and slightly cheaper than W-S list.
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[User Picture]From: mrs_redboots
2010-04-14 06:54 pm (UTC)
I love Le Creuset; one of my wedding-presents was two Le Creuset frying-pans. One was too heavy for every-day use, and I am not sure what has happened to it; the other, an omelette pan, is used often. And I have a griddle pan and two casserole dishes, which I adore. And, sounds most peculiar, but the thing I use most often is - a garlic press!
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[User Picture]From: jodel_from_aol
2010-04-15 04:45 am (UTC)
Out here W-S has a close competitor called Sur le Table. Nice stores, but the pricing such that there really isn't much to choose between them. They each sometimes carry slightly different items from a maker's whole line, though, and LeCreuset is one of the lines that they usually have a good showing from.

They've both got catalogs and websites, but I don't know whether that's a route you really want to have to deal with. Shipping something made of cast iron isn't likely to be cheap.
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