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From Twitter 02-12-2011 - MoonScape [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
e_moon60

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From Twitter 02-12-2011 [Feb. 13th, 2011|03:01 am]
e_moon60

  • 10:29:31: Unblanketed Old Yellow since it's above freezing. Idiot horse had managed to squirm blanket partway off anyway.
  • 12:03:00: Peas and onions survived the big freeze under cover. Radishes...not so lucky. Sowbugs got 'em, I think. One rose definitely a goner.

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[User Picture]From: catsittingstill
2011-02-13 12:56 pm (UTC)
I first read the demise of the radishes as "*Snow* bugs got 'em" which made me wonder if there are bugs that are particularly active (heck, active at all) under snow.

I wouldn't think so, bugs being cold blooded after all, but plants aren't exactly known for regulating their temperature and I seem to recall that skunk cabbage apparently does it.

Maybe in a world with magic there could be snow bugs.
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[User Picture]From: amm_me
2011-02-13 07:15 pm (UTC)
snow fleas - http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/critter/insect/snowflea.htm

Elizabeth, I'm sure sorry about the rose. Just the wrong kind of winter.
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[User Picture]From: catsittingstill
2011-02-13 10:39 pm (UTC)
Very cool! Thanks for the pointer.
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[User Picture]From: jon_d_r
2011-02-13 10:17 pm (UTC)

sow bugs

That's it. I was trying to think of that common name of the isopod. I recently saw a picture of a marine isopod that was 2 1/2 feet long. It didn't look all that different, except for the size, of course. They are eaten in China as a sort of seafood (http://guildofscientifictroubadours.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/isopod_450.jpg). The isopods are some of my favorite animals, after the water bears (tardigrades http://serc.carleton.edu/images/microbelife/topics/special_collections/tardigrade.jpg).
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[User Picture]From: amm_me
2011-02-13 10:53 pm (UTC)

Re: sow bugs

WE never called them sow bugs; they were pillbugs, Although some of my friends referred to them as roly-polies.

I wonder if you need a lobster-pick to eat that huge isopod?
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2011-02-14 01:11 am (UTC)

Re: sow bugs

There's more than one kind. The kind we had where I grew up were rounder on top, almost black, and rolled up to become spherical...we called them roly-polies and they were perfect for rolling back and forth in the pencil groove of old fashioned school desks (nothing like desks today) when bored in class. The ones I call "sowbugs" are isopods all right, but flatter on top, lighter in color, and do not roll up neatly.

They all eat tender young vegetation, though.

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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2011-02-14 01:12 am (UTC)

Re: sow bugs

Tardigrades are SO cute.

The prize of yesterday's uncovering of the garden, though, was a very small millipede, less than two inches long.
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[User Picture]From: jon_d_r
2011-02-14 04:53 am (UTC)

Re: sow bugs

Hopefully the millipede was after the sow bugs .
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