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e_moon60

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Tropical Lagoon Socks Finished [Jun. 20th, 2014|11:53 am]
e_moon60
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tropic-lagoon-socks-sandals
First wearing, with sandals.  The turquoise is more turquoise, and the blue more lavender.


tropic-lagoon-socks215
Here the turquoise shows better, and one of the "hot purple" stripes (left sock.)
The pair of toe stripes are the same purple, but don't show up that way.
I like to wear socks "raw", without washing or blocking, the first time, so my feet can do the blocking in the course of a day's wear.   The socks are not as soft as they will be, but they're still comfortable enough to make my feet happy.  Only the ribbing stripe and the toe stripe are intended to match in position; the others are not really random, but they're not matching.  Having one of the yarns variegated helped with that, of course.   The purple yarn is Cascade 220 Orchid Heather, and it's a fascinating blend of blue and a strong hot pink/fuschia.

Now on to a regular royal blue pair and a pair of shorties whose color scheme I haven't picked yet.  I need three more pairs of the shorties for a good rotation, and wouldn't mind having more than that.

Anyone who's made socks before can easily make short socks for sandals or low shoes...I devised the formula for my version after seeing a picture of a quite different pair in a book (different yarn gauge, color, heel, toe, type of ribbing), just substituting what I wanted instead.  Whatever makes your feet happy is a good sock!

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Comments:
From: sheff_dogs
2014-06-20 09:46 pm (UTC)
Orchid Heather looks as if it would do a fair imitation of a heather covered hillside in bloom if you mixed it with the right green.
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2014-06-23 01:59 pm (UTC)
What sort of green would be the right green? (Inquiring mind wants to know...haven't a clue.)
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From: sheff_dogs
2014-06-23 10:07 pm (UTC)
A dull green rather than a bright one, the way a coniferous forest is a dull green. Lighter than pine green, a mid green with odd lighter bits where the bilberries (European version of blueberries, much small, both fruit and bush) are showing through. The heather in flower looks like a purple, violet and pink haze over the green. It's a beautiful sight and the smell is intoxicating.You wouldn't see much green, just enough to give a little contrast.
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[User Picture]From: thistlethorn
2014-06-20 10:07 pm (UTC)
Very pretty!!
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2014-06-23 01:59 pm (UTC)
Thanks!
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[User Picture]From: gifted
2014-06-22 12:23 pm (UTC)
They look rad!
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2014-06-23 02:00 pm (UTC)
Thanks. I'm enjoying them.
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[User Picture]From: amm_me
2014-06-24 04:10 pm (UTC)
When you have *enough* socks. will you do something else with your time? Or is knitting them going to be like making money - "never enough! never enough!":-)
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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2014-06-24 05:01 pm (UTC)
Knitting again started as therapy for my hands; it requires completely different hand movements from typing, which is what I do most and what makes my hands hurt. So I will keep knitting, for that alone.

I've asked myself how many pairs is "enough" socks, and the answer is "Way more than I thought when I started." Socks wear out, and thus new socks need to be knitted...but also I"m getting older and (as tomorrow's eye surgery shows) my eyes are not perfect. Never were, but worse now. My father went essentially blind in his last years (he died this year at 101.) My mother didn't live that long, but she had macular degeneration which robbed her of the ability to do the sewing, knitting, needlepoint she'd looked forward to doing after retirement. By the time she died, at 77 (complications of chronic renal failure) she could not really read books or knit anything complicated.

So if I want to wear hand-knit socks the rest of my life--a life likely to be longer than my mother's, barring accidents, and more like those of other family members w/o major health problems (upper 80s to low 100s) then either I have to be able to knit a certain number of pairs per year, or I need a huge stash of socks to provide a very long rotation. Leaving aside accidents that could kill me tomorrow or any other day, it's reasonable to think I'll live into my 90s...so say 25 more years of socks will be needed. The more pairs you have, if you wear them in rotation, the longer each sock will last. Both wearing and washing affect sock life (as does the yarn type, yarn size, density of fabric, weight of the wearer, surface walked on, etc.)

The calculations are simple and inexorable, with some evidence from the first pairs I knitted (now approaching or over 2 years old) that my basic assumption that socks knit of the yarn I use most will last about 100 wearings, if I don't snag them on something and rip a hole. A sock worn once a week gets 52 wearings a year, and thus will make roughly two years (=/- a couple of weeks.) Worn once every two weeks, it has 26 wearings a year, and will reach almost 4 years. A sock worn every 30.42 days (!) will be worn 12 times a year, and wear out in 8 1/3 years. (Worn on the nearest 7 day rotation, 28 days, it will be worn 13 times a year, and thus last 7.69 years.)

Let's pause to look at the number of socks it takes to reach the modest goal of socks lasting 8 1/3 years. That's 31 pairs of socks...and, moreover, 31 pairs of socks who started in a 30.42 day rotation. All the socks before that started in shorter rotations and thus have a shorter life span. I started making socks toward the end of January 2012. I have now completed 24 pairs of socks...but I don't have 24 pairs of socks. Three first-year socks are out of service: two from wearing holes in them, and one from a snag. All the first year socks before the 7th pair were worn more than once in seven days (and the most heavily used, the first pair, wore out first.) At best, my latest pair, finished last week, is in a 21 day rotation, but even that isn't exactly right. The short socks are for summer wear only, and in the hot months when I'm riding the bike, they're worn in preference to the taller socks. I have five pair (counting the new ones) to wear, and that means wearing the same pair more than once a week. At present, I'm wearing pairs 4 and 5 of the short socks twice for each time I wear the first three pairs, to even out the wear (the first two were knit last summer, and the third was knit in the fall, so I started this hot-season biking with three pair.) (More in second rock--LJ's annoying max character length for comments has bitten me.)

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[User Picture]From: e_moon60
2014-06-24 05:05 pm (UTC)

Second half of sock need calculation

I have one pair of "really cold weather" socks now--the Herdwick yarn socks. I wore them 12 times in less than three weeks when we had back-to-back very cold (for us) weather. But they've been "off" since then, and I'm saving them for the coldest weather. That means the regular socks are 21 - 6 (the shorties and the Herdwick socks)...I have only 15 pair of regular socks to rotate.

That's barely enough, and 5 pair (knitted the first year) I expect to wear out by year's end. Meanwhile, not all yarns are equal, and some wear out faster than others. By experimenting with different yarns, I've found out that my first yarn (accidental choice, based on color and gauge only) is--aside from the Herdwick--the longest wearing yarn I've used. I have two pair of beautiful, soft, socks that are wearing out much faster than the others (they're second-year-knit socks, and thus should last another year easily, but clearly they won't.) I need replacements for the first-year socks that are wearing out, and the second-year socks that are the weakest, and thus...the number keeps growing. I will be knitting socks predominantly for several more years. Current plans are to knit more Herdwick socks (too hot for much of the year, but excellent in freezing weather) up to 7 pairs...that will allow me to wear the really warm socks for several weeks (with time for them to dry between wearings--this yarn is hardwearing and very warm, but also slow to dry), more "regular" socks (the tall socks) in the basic yarns I know last around 100 wearings, and more of the short socks for the hottest part of summer, about 4 months here. I would like a three week rotation of the shorties, a five week rotation of the regulars.

Another thing--these are all wool socks, and not Superwash...they are hand-washed (quick and easy) and then air-dried, not put in the dryer. On a hot Texas summer day, they dry on the line. The colder the weather, the more humid the air, the longer they take to dry. In wet winter weather, drying indoors, they can take 3 days to dry completely (regular yarns) and even 4 days (Herdwick.) So it's necessary to have enough socks to be sure of having dry pair.



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