woods, Elizabeth, camera, April

Heat and Age

As I've said before (as you know Bob) I grew up in a hot, often humid climate.   I was a healthy kid, outdoors a lot, and though I certainly didn't enjoy the sticky hot nights before my mother put in a window AC, I could play hard outdoors in the summer without a problem.  Through high school, college, and even moving back to Texas after leaving the military, I was pretty much heat-proof.  Hiked, rode horses, lived once again in un-airconditioned houses, gardened, etc.  Even after we moved here, the first years we didn't use air conditioning and I went on--often uncomfortable, but not having real problems with the heat.

The first time I had a problem,  it was on a long afternoon walk on the land we'd bought the year before--a hot, humid day with little wind.  We came out of the creek woods into the fierce sun, and partway along the south fenceline I felt bad enough I had to lie down.  But I recovered fast and walked back to the house without a problem.  We had begun to use AC by that point, finding that we couldn't sleep on the hot, breathless nights without it.  Years later, I had another bout.  A few years after that, another.  Once per summer, perhaps, but not every summer.  I became more careful about hydration, about moving more slowly, resting here and there in the shade before moving on.
Collapse )
woods, Elizabeth, camera, April

Sometimes...

Elsewhere,  sometimes, it seems people are flat out determined to misunderstand.   Mis-hear, mis-read.   There's a school of thought that says it's the speaker/writer's responsibility to be plain enough that the hearer/reader always gets the message intended, but that presumes the speaker/writer knows a) who is going to be the hearer/reader and b) a lot about how the hearer/reader interprets speech/writing.

In a group of friends, who know each other well, misunderstandings are rarer.  Not nonexistent, but rarer, and the person who doesn't understand is usually willing to say something like "I didn't understand that--did you mean this?  Or that?" and a fruitful discussion may ensue.   But online, where the entire world may walk into the conversation (and you have no idea what their background knowledge is, or their personality, or whatever)  the stage is set for massive problems.  Some hearer/readers think they know what was said/written, and what meaning the speaker/writer intended to convey.   In fact, they're sure they know, and they're sure how far that meaning can be extended.  ("I don't like strawberry ice-cream" could end up being interpreted as an attack on strawberry growers.  No, I'm not kidding.  Agricultural interests are very sensitive about any perceived criticism of their crop/livestock and readily extend it from the simple "I don't like strawberry ice-cream" to "You're against strawberries because (list of made-up reasons.)"

It is impossible for a speaker/writer to convey accurate information (beyond 2 + 2 in base 10 = 4) , let alone opinion, to everyone in the same utterance/text, because of the highly variable nature of hearers/readers online...and the certainty of so many that they know what was meant when, in fact, did not have the right Sekrit Decoder Ring for that speech/text, but thought they did.   You can be careful.  You can work over a comment, comment reply, initial post over and over, considering every person you think *likely* to read it, and yet someone will not only get it wrong, but boldly announce that you meant something quite different from what you did mean, and then other people will jump on that bandwagon (some without even reading the original.)  

I try not to be that listener/reader.   Sometimes I probably am, because most of us, in some situations, think we know more about someone else's thought processes than we do.  But having been slammed all my life by those who did not grasp the point I was trying to make, I do try to avoid assuming I understand when I may not. 
woods, Elizabeth, camera, April

More Socks Finished

I now have two pairs of striped shorty socks with the same frame (rolled top, short leg, heel, toe) but very different stripe patterns.  The tale of these two pairs was partly told in the last entry, but it goes like this.  The original idea, because I had quite a bit of blue, red, and yellow leftover yarn, was to make socks in the colors I associated with the Ringling Brothers/Barnum & Bailey Circus videos our son loved when he was younger. However, though I started them close together, and got the heels turned the same day,  Sock 1 got far ahead of Sock 2.  I decided that some green would look better in the middle of the other colors (it's not the green you see--it's a rich, emerald green, but it always photographs lighter and "duller" than it is.)    I was sick for a lot of the work on Sock 1.   And then, by accident, I misplaced Sock 1 when Sock 2 had just started its first red stripe.  I couldn't remember the relative proportion of the colors.   After a month of unsuccessful hunting and grumping, I gave up and started a third sock to go with sock 2.   These became the "Rainbow" socks, and I finished them (except for weaving in the yarn tails for each stripe) right before heading to WorldCon.

  Rainbow-socks-on-8-26   Rainbow-sock-L-8-26Single sock shows blue "frame"
Collapse )
woods, Elizabeth, camera, April

Finally! (Socks finished.)

So finally the socks I first named Circus Socks (intending them to be the colors used in Ringling Bros. circus ads) and now named Rainbow Socks, were finished today, except for weaving in the stripe ends, which can happen on the train.

Rainbow-socks-finished-08-15-16
Collapse )
woods, Elizabeth, camera, April

Wildlife Rescue (mirrored from Universes blog)

I was walking back to the house today when I heard a sort of scuffling noise that seemed to be coming from the carport.   It didn’t sound like an ordinary cat-noise, but I thought one of the idiot younglings might have gotten up in the engine compartment and then stuck there.  Or even (not a happy thought) in the interior of the car.   No cat, adult or middler,  was in the car, under the car, or responded when I thumped the roof.  But something scuffled somewhere.   I followed the noise and began to hear watery noises.  Water?  It hasn’t rained for weeks (and weeks.)  Little splashes and scuffles….and then I realized something alive was in the washout pipe of the rainwater collection system.

Wildlife-in-the-pipe-08-03-2016

Collapse )

woods, Elizabeth, camera, April

Back to Knitting, Briefly

The physical Wall I hit back in April affected everything I was trying to do, including knitting.   Last year I was often able to knit while sick, but by March I was making many more mistakes when trying to knit while sick--or even in the brief respites between things.  So the attempt to start a new pair of short socks toward the end of April quickly met defeat--for then.  Toward the end of May, I was finally able to get a heel turned on one of them, and it looked like this:

1-blue-short-sock
Collapse )
woods, Elizabeth, camera, April

No, That's Not Christian

So Pence said today on television--I saw it, unfortunately (I was looking for local weather and got this instead) that he was a Christian, a conservative, and a Republican, in that order.

Wrong.  Pence is a Republican, yes, but he's neither a Christian, nor a conservative: he's a Republican extremist.   I have posted before about the curious theology that calls itself Christian but doesn't do what Jesus said to do, and instead does things Jesus said not to do.  And the political philosophy that calls itself "conservative" but doesn't actually "conserve" (or even try to conserve)  anything but the privilege of rich white guys, is not, in fact conservative.  It's wasteful, destructive, the very opposite of what "conservative" means.Collapse )